Muvarkoil

The main shrines of Moovar Koil all display the hallmarks of southern Indian temple architecture – in this case, a main vestibule built in a rectangular layout mounted with ornately carved, layered pyramidal roofs. Since these were dedicated to Shiva, the entrance to each shrine features a carving of Nandi the Bull as gate-guardian. The outer walls of the shrines feature intricately carved dancing figurines ensconced in rectangular niches, and elaborate motifs. This seems to be a slight departure from the typical architectural zeitgeist of the time. While only two of the three main temples survive today, the ‘ardha-mandapam’ or the base, of each remains intact. The three structures are also surrounded by sixteen smaller temples and all of them looked out on to a large, main compound. Two gates, in the west and northeast, were once built into a surrounding compound wall. The roof of each temple consists of three different tiers. The topmost layer resembles an inverted lotus and features horse-shoe shaped carvings along all four sides. On the whole, the architecture of Moovar Koil seems to display a mix of influences and styles. The shrines feature techniques that would later gain prominence in Pallava temples, while several features also seem to borrow from Buddhist artistic styles.

About Muvarkoil

The main shrines of Moovar Koil all display the hallmarks of southern Indian temple architecture – in this case, a main vestibule built in a rectangular layout mounted with ornately carved, layered pyramidal roofs. Since these were dedicated to Shiva, the entrance to each shrine features a carving of Nandi the Bull as gate-guardian. The outer walls of the shrines feature intricately carved dancing figurines ensconced in rectangular niches, and elaborate motifs. This seems to be a slight departure from the typical architectural zeitgeist of the time. While only two of the three main temples survive today, the ‘ardha-mandapam’ or the base, of each remains intact. The three structures are also surrounded by sixteen smaller temples and all of them looked out on to a large, main compound. Two gates, in the west and northeast, were once built into a surrounding compound wall. The roof of each temple consists of three different tiers. The topmost layer resembles an inverted lotus and features horse-shoe shaped carvings along all four sides. On the whole, the architecture of Moovar Koil seems to display a mix of influences and styles. The shrines feature techniques that would later gain prominence in Pallava temples, while several features also seem to borrow from Buddhist artistic styles.

Monument Information

Address

Agarapatti, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu 621316, India

How To Reach

  • Nearest Airport :Tiruchirapalli International Airport
  • Nearest Railway Station :Manaparai
  • Nearest Bus Station : Viralimalai Bus Stand

Opening Hours

  • Opening Time : 06:00:00 am
  • Closing Time :06:00:00 pm

Weather

  • Monsoon : Maximum: 31.9°C Minimum: 24.4°C

    Summer : Maximum: 38.0°C Minimum: 27.7°C

    Winter : Maximum: 28.8°C Minimum: 20.4°C

    Recommended Season to Visit : Winter season (November-March)

Facilities available At the Monument

Contact Details

  • Dr. A.M.V. Subramanyam
  • Phone: 044-25670396
  • E-mail: circlecha.asi@gmail.com

Ticket Information

Terms & Conditions

  • The e-ticket is not transferable.
  • Entry Fee is not refundable.
  • E-ticket cancellations are not permitted.
  • The Monument is open for visitors between sunrise and sunset.
  • Visitor shall be required to show photo identity proof in original at the entry to the monument.
  • Edibles are not allowed inside the monument.
  • Inflammable/dangerous/explosive articles are not allowed.
INDIAN Visitor:
Total ₹ 25
₹ 25 - by ASI as Entry fee & ₹ 0 - by ADI as Toll tax
FOREIGNER Visitor:
Total ₹ 300
₹ 300 - by ASI as Entry fee & ₹ 0 - by ADI as Toll tax
SAARC Visitor:
Total ₹ 25
₹ 25 - by ASI as Entry fee & ₹ 0 - by ADI as Toll tax
BIMSTEC Visitor:
Total ₹ 25
₹ 25 - by ASI as Entry fee & ₹ 0 - by ADI as Toll tax